Posts Tagged ‘IRO’

 

Happy Halloween everyone! At this time of year, with the ghouls and goblins on the prowl, I thought I would point out the Top 6 Scariest Investor Relations Practices I see on a regular basis.  As an investor, when I begin to research a company, I have a process I go through when vetting all potential deals. When it comes to the Investor Relations component, I am still shocked at how many companies make horrifying mistakes. Here are the Investor Relations Practices that scare me away from a potential investment:

6. The Shadowy, Uneducated IR Professional

It still shocks me that there are individuals representing companies in an IR role that have no idea of what they are doing. Don’t get me wrong, I know everyone starts out ‘green’, and most people learn on the job, but I encounter some individuals that have been in the industry for a few years, and have yet to make the effort to educate themselves. Time to take a course, read a book, and join your local NIRI or CIRI chapter.

5. Ghastly Websites

The corporate website is the most important marketing piece a company controls, but yet I still see alarming websites every week. I shake my head, and move my attention to the next company immediately. If a company still does not understand how valuable their website can be, and the damage it can cause if it is outdated, then they don’t deserve my time or money.

4. Hair-raising, Over-Promotional IR Types

When I talk to a CEO, or an IRO, I fully expect to see their passion, and hear how great their project is. What turns me off a project is when the IRO goes beyond the investment opportunity and turns into the wicked, used car salesman. Give me the facts, save the hard sell, and don’t tell me if I don’t get in on the deal today, I will miss the stock jump coming this week.

3. Haunted Social Media Deniers

Social Media and Social Networking is growing rapidly, and I hope to see the companies I am looking at least taking steps to monitor what is being said about their company. If the senior executives are burying their heads and ignoring the potential opportunity, I question their commitment to Investor Relations. If the IROs are doing this as well, then I move on to the next deal. The IRO may be having trouble convincing the C-Suite, but they need to be trying, and there are several things they could be doing on their own with little time commitment, and for little money.

2. Vampiric Social Media Companies

On the other hand, things get really creepy when I see a Social Media Company running a campaign for a public company that has no understanding of security commission regulations, or exchange rules. If you are going to hire an outside firm to help you with your Social Media campaign, and there are a lot of good ones, make sure they understand your company, industry, and the proper rules of your stock exchange. The last thing your company needs is to get flagged by the regulators for being perilous with your tweets, and comments made in the social media space.

1. Ghostlike, No Investor Relations at All

Yes it is true; there are still public companies that don’t understand the value that an educated Investor Relations professional can bring to their company. Some tell me the IR is handled by the CFO or another executive, and others don’t believe the value add is worth the expense. Some have had a bad experience with a poor IRO, and don’t know where to find a qualified professional. I always advise them to give it another shot, and to search for a qualified IRO through their local CIRI or NIRI branch. CIRI has just graduated their first class of Professionally Certified Investor Relations Professionals through the IVEY School of Business, take a look here for a qualified professional.

I wish you a spooky Halloween wherever you may be, and please add to our list, What IR Practices Horrify You?

 

All the best,

Jon

How to Succeed at Investor Conferences

February 28th, 2012 by Jon Bey

I received a call the other day from an individual new to Investor Relations. She had just been hired by a junior exploration company in Vancouver and was asked to represent her company at the upcoming PDAC mining conference in Toronto. This will be her first experience as an Investor Relations professional representing a company, and it just happens to be at the largest mining convention in the world. Now what?

Depending on whom you ask, these investor conferences can be of great benefit or a complete waste of resources. I believe they can be both. If you prepare properly and follow a game plan, these conferences can be extremely valuable. But, if you show up unprepared, it may be a fun experience but a complete waste of corporate funds and time.

I caught up with Bear Creek Mining’s Lisa May, an experienced IR professional, currently completing her professional Certification in Investor Relations from CIRI and the IVEY school of Business. We discussed investor conferences and came up with these four areas which are critical to the success of Investor Relations professionals.

4 pillars of a successful Investors Conference plan

There are four pillars to a successful investor conference plan. If you follow all four, you will have success and will have created value for your company. Miss any of these crucial pillars, and your conference might have been a waste of time and money.

1. Identifying the right conferences
2. Preparing for the conference
3. Executing the conference plan
4. Conference follow up – measurement of success

Identifying the right conferences for your company

First, you must understand your own company. You will need to figure out the basic facts about your company before you can figure out which conferences to attend. Next, find out from Sr. management what the corporate strategy is and why they want you to attend the conferences. Finally, use your detective skills to search for all potential industry specific conferences. Once you know these answers, it should be easy to identify the right conferences to attend.

• What industry are you in? (no brainer)
• Why does your company want to you attend the conferences? What is the strategy?
• What stage is your company in? (grass roots exploration, advanced exploration, mining)
• What’s your market cap size? (micro-cap, small cap, mid cap, large cap)
• Who are your company’s peers? (companies similar to yours)
• What conferences do your peers attend? – which ones do they recommend?
• What is your company willing to spend to attend the conferences? Some are expensive!
• Where does your management want to gain traction? – find investors, analysts, fund managers, brokers etc. (local, Canada, USA, Europe, Asia)
• Search online – maybe there are new conferences this year.
• Search through your social networks – ask what conferences to attend on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook.

Preparing for the conference

Now that you have identified a few conferences that look intriguing, the next steps are to get registered for the conference and start the process of preparation. The registration is the easy part as long as the conference is open to all. You may find the conference you want to attend is by invitation only and your company may not meet the criteria this year. Once you have registered, the real work begins. The preparation stage is by far the most important.

• Identify the company goals for the conference. Why are you attending? (To gain retail investors, meet institutional investors, business development, or networking)
• Book all the conference extras (tables, chairs, carpet, insurance etc.)
• Book travel for you and your conference materials. (you may send your booth early)
• Do you have a conference booth? Is it current? Do you have a graphic designer to provide current material for the banners? Is your booth functional? How do you set it up, Test it out. Make sure you do a dry run in your office!
• Prepare the marketing materials: fact sheets, corporate presentations etc.
• Locate a local printer near the conference in case more materials are needed.
• Plan your schedule around the conference – what other events, meetings can you arrange for your management team?
• Invite investors, brokers, shareholders to visit you at the booth – by email and through social networks like: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.
• Prepare your strategy and game plan for your days at the booth. How will you engage investors? How will you track your conversations?
• Prepare a list of frequently asked questions you will likely be asked at your booth and rehearse your answers
• Add the conference to the Calendar section of your company website – maybe highlight the conference on the homepage.
• Prepare a strategy to measure your success at the show – did you accomplish your goals?

Show time – During the conference

You have managed to get this far; now it is time to perform. I strongly recommend you arrive at least one day early and make use of the early set-up time for your booth. Sometimes they break or have issues that you will want to solve before the morning of the show. Once the doors open and the investors start to roll in, you need to be on your game. Try to have more than a few hours of sleep; this can be difficult at times. Here are a few tips once the investors start to walk the aisles.

• Don’t get worried if many investors don’t want to speak to you, each investor has different agendas and specific companies and sectors they follow.
• Start with a smile and a nice greeting to those that stop by your booth.
• Define roles of those in the booth. Are you manning the booth alone, or with the company CEO?
• Have a few good opening questions like: Have you heard of our company? Are you interested in copper? If that is your speciality, can I answer any questions for you?
• Don’t act like a used car salesman.
• Engage your audience; find out if they are a current shareholder, what kind of investor they are, how they hear heard about your company?
• Create an opportunity for follow-up.
• Create a spreadsheet and record details of the good meetings you had, and try to collect a business card or contact details.
• Tweet about the conference while it is occurring, inviting people to your booth to meet you.
• Try to attend any Tweet-ups you have been invited to – maybe create your own.
• Add the conference information to your corporate Facebook page and add daily updates and pictures of the events.
• Try to get some video footage of your CEO or management at the conference.
• Try to arrange some media coverage (perhaps an interview for your Sr. management).

Follow up and measurement of success – Was the conference a good return on investment?

Once the tradeshow is over and you have packed up the booth and sent it on its way, it will be time for a cold drink and a quick reflection on the success of the event. You may want to wait until you return home, but don’t procrastinate: do these before you move on to your next task and while your memories are fresh. Here’s what I do:

• Review your spreadsheet and compare it to your original goals – did you meet the number of retail and institutional brokers you had hoped?
• Did you meet your networking goals?
• Did you manage to arrange any business development meetings?
• Did you meet the shareholders that you invited to the booth?
• Were your social media and social network activities a success?
• Review your pre-conference checklist – did all go as planned? What changes would you make?
• Were you happy with the travel arrangements? Was the hotel acceptable?
• What events, activities did you not know about that you want to include for next year?
• Plan your follow-up with all the individuals you met with.
• Update your list of frequently asked questions.
• Create a document that you can share with Sr. management and the board showing them the company’s success at the conference and a plan to improve next year’s event.
• Plan your meeting with your CEO to review your compensation – you are surely due for a raise!

We hope this has been a helpful tool. Please contact us should you have any questions or would like assistance with any of your Corporate Investor Relations needs: Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook. Talk soon, see you at the next Investors Conference!

Jon Bey – Steel Rose Communications

In the world of investor relations, an IRO with a large rolodex of stock brokers can be very successful and in high demand. The trick is attaining that rolodex. Some say it can be bought, but I disagree. I am sure we have all been approached by people trying to sell us a contact list, but the rolodex is only as good as the relationships that the IRO has built with those brokers over time. So how do you build up your rolodex? You have to find a way to connect and build a relationship with each broker, and this is an ongoing exercise. The good news is, with the help of social networks, it is getting easier.

Are rookie brokers worth the time investment?

Not all brokers are the same; one seasoned broker, with a fantastic book of clients, can have more influence than one hundred rookie brokers just starting their careers. Does this mean you should focus your time on getting to know just the senior brokers? No not really. First of all, it’s very difficult to meet the top brokers; they aren’t usually the ones at the networking functions looking for clients and contacts. Secondly, if you want to build your network for future years, get to know those rookies as they will develop into the power brokers of the future.

So how do you meet your local brokers?

This is the hard part, it will require a herculean effort, and a staggering amount of time. You can’t sit in your office and just cold call them unless you are lucky enough to have the hottest company in town. You have to get out and network. Go to the tradeshows, to the coffee shops, the restaurants where they hang out, and the social events they attend and introduce yourself. Always carry a stack of your business cards and be prepared with your pitch of who you are, what you do, and why they would want to connect with you. Hopefully you have a current project worth speaking to them about but if you don’t, let them know you will in the near future.

Use your connections and get introduced.

I have always found that a warm introduction from a friend or contact helps make that initial conversation much easier – so leverage your contacts. This is another reason you should be networking. The more people you get to know, the more potential introductions you can benefit from. And remember, networking is a two way street and you should aim to pay it forward by giving more referrals than you ask for.

Are you plugged in to social networks?

If you are in investor relations and you are not set up on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn – then either start immediately or leave the profession, because you are a dinosaur and about to become extinct. In a 2011 survey, ‘Social Media Use by Financial Advisors‘, Socialware found that 84% of brokers across North America are using social networks for business purposes and these numbers are up from 60% in 2010. The financial world is adapting and increasingly plugging in to these networks so it is becoming even easier to get an online introduction. Remember, if your goal is to establish a relationship with brokers then you need to be aware of social media etiquette. If you make a mistake here you may make that bad first impression and never get the face to face introduction you are striving for. Don’t think that just by joining these social media networks that hundreds of brokers are going to try and connect with you. It is still going to take a great deal of time and effort, but at least these online networks make it a bit easier. For example, on LinkedIn, you can scroll through all your friends contacts, and identify people you want to connect with. Then you just need to ask your friend to introduce you either in person or online. Presto – your rolodex is growing, and maybe your value as an IRO as well.

Need some help?

Get out there and network. There is a “mining connect” event coming up in Vancouver next week called Howe Street Gone Mad. http://revolvemarketing.ca/blog/howe-street-gone-mad-miningconnect-launch-party/. Hope to see you there!

If you would like more information on the socialware white paper on financial advisors use of social media, please follow this link:  http://www.socialware.com/resources/overview/ 

And, don’t forget to say ‘Hi’ to Steel Rose Communications via Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn

 

 

 

What can an IRO learn from the BC Lions?

December 1st, 2011 by Jon Bey

This past weekend in Vancouver, the BC Lions completed a remarkable season by winning the Grey Cup at home, almost effortlessly. The fascinating part of the story – the team had one of its worst starts in franchise history. I can’t remember a team in my lifetime, in any sport, starting that poorly, and winning the championship. So what happened this year in the Lion’s Den? And what lessons can an IRO learn from our Lions?

Good Companies – Bad Results

Let’s be realistic – bad things happen to good companies. It happens every day. Many decent companies collapse when things go bad. And, many also manage to survive the first collapse, only then to stagnate soon thereafter. Then there are a select few that manage to right the ship, and strike gold. The Lions did it, what was their formula for success?

Build the Management Team

Every business needs to assemble a strong leadership team. In the corporate world, we hire the Board of Directors, and the Senior Management team. The BC Lions hired Wally Buono as the GM, and his Coaching Staff to run their company.

Corporate Strategy

Once the leadership was in place, the next task was to devise a Corporate Strategy. The Lions needed a roadmap to lead them to the Grey Cup. What would they stand for? How would they accomplish their goals? This is an exciting time in the life of a company, and hopefully an IRO will be a part of this early development in the company’s life.

Gather the Assets

With the leadership and strategy in place, it is now time to gather the assets. For a  Mining Company, this would be the projects. For the Lions – their players. The mining execs would have a game plan to gather the assets, identify exactly what they were looking for, and then sign contracts to secure those assets. Sound familiar? As the years progress, the Mining Company acquires new projects, and releases old assets that may not have worked out as planned. Each season Wally, and his coaches, identified the team strengths and weaknesses, cut loose their weak players, and targeted new assets that would strengthen their team.

Future Looks Bright

As the Lions’ season approached, the company looked great. They had a strong leadership team, an excellent game plan, valuable assets, and excited, invested stakeholders. Their Investor Relations and Communications team were primed for success, as well, especially as they were hosting the Grey Cup in their state-of-the-art $750 Million renovated stadium – a marketing dream season! There would be enough worthy news to keep the stakeholders engaged the entire season.

The Season Begins

Then the games started and disaster struck. After a dismal 0-5 start, local media declared the Lions “A disaster, and by far the worst team in the league”. Stakeholders were calling for management’s termination, and for the assets to be divested. Blow up the team and start over. Sound familiar?

Fast Forward

Fast forward to the end-of-season press conference. The team management were asked what was going through their minds when they were 0-5? Were they scared of losing their jobs? Did they doubt their leadership? Did they question their players’ abilities? Did they change their game plan?

What Did Management Do?

Sometimes companies have the right team assembled, they comprise a great strategy, assemble a fantastic asset, but when they implement the plan things go horribly wrong at the start. That was the case with this year’s team. Was it time to panic? No. Was it time to blow up the team and management? No. It was time to assess the situation, stick to the game plan, and make minor adjustments. When things go wrong, leadership needs to assess what is wrong, and fix it before it is too late. Wally and his team did a great job of communicating with their stakeholders. They were honest, transparent, and available. They didn’t sugar coat the situation, they laid out the facts and repeated their messaging. “We are a good team, we have the right people and we are going to get better.”

Role of the IRO

The IRO has a crucial role to play with the Senior Management team in these situations. The IRO has to be the eyes and ears of the company, listening to what the Stakeholders are whispering , or perhaps screaming. Today’s IRO has to be Social Media savvy, plugged in to the areas where the information is flowing fast and furious. Ask the hard questions. Know where to find the answers.

Communicating and Engaging

In turn, the IRO has to get the message to the Street.  And, simply sending out a press release won’t cut it anymore. And yet, joining a few social networks after a crisis strikes is too late. If the IRO is not already plugged in, and engaged, through social media by this stage in the process, it’s too late. The IRO has a vast array of communication tools at his/her disposal today; and the good IRO’s know how – and when –  to use these tools to communicate effectively in every situation.

Stick to Your Vision

Wally and his coaches persevered through a difficult stretch this season. They were bent, but they didn’t break. They made minor adjustments to their plan, but kept the focus on the big picture, and worked at improving their team one step at a time. Wally may never coach again. His final season may be his most memorable, and that’s saying a lot for arguably the best coach in the history of the CFL. I will remember the stand he took for his players, and coaching staff, after their brutal start. “We have a great team, and we are going to turn this around. We have to be more accountable for our effort and mistakes, and that starts with me.”

What Are Your Thoughts?

What other things could an IRO have been doing? What other lessons are there here? Please send us your comments we would love to hear from you: comment below, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn.

Connect With Us

At Steel Rose Communications, we help public companies focus their Corporate Strategy, and devise an IR game plan. Could your team use some coaching assistance? Contact us, we would love to help.